Zahnley, Don

IN MEMORY

OF

DON ZAHNLEY

February 19, 1940 – June 3, 2004

 


He was survived by his

Brother; James Zahnley and wife Beverly Schneider of Oakland, CA

4 Nephews: Tim and Paul Zahnley and Paul and Charles Schneider and

3 Great-nephews; Ethan Zahnley and Benjamin and Brandon Schneider

 

From the Manhattan Mercury obituary"Don was born the second son of James Walter and Hazel L. (Anderson) Zahnley."

     "After graduation, Don served four years in the United States Marine Corps.  Following his military service, he returned to Manhattan and attended Kansas State University, graduating in January 1966 with a degree in business."

     "He worked for the Coleman Company for several years prior to becoming a federal bank examiner, retiring in February 1995."

     "Don had lived in Topeka and Oklahoma City, OK, and returned to Manhattan in 1996."

     "He was an avid supporter of the KSU Women’s basketball program, and was a very active KSU Alumni supporter.  He also enjoyed golf and other sports."

     "Internment with military honors was in Sunset Cemetery in Manhattan."

 

Reflections:  (submitted by Janet Krider (Duncan)

     "Don was a wonderful treasurer for the Class of ’58.  He always came to every meeting and was funny and treated us to all the stories he had about KSU Women’s Basketball, which were many.  He was a regular at the Lady Cats basketball practices and knew many of the players and coaches personally.  The entire team served as honorary pall bearers at his funeral and Deb Patterson spoke of his support and dedication to the program."

     "Don was also dedicated to his own physical fitness and workout program.  Once, when a few of us from the class were at my house, more socially than for class business, Don hadn’t come.  It was early in the evening, so I called Don and asked him to come on over.  But he wouldn’t do it … it wasn’t part of his routine, he said, which had to start the next morning with a swim at the KSU pool at 5:30 and then would go on to the Peters Rec Center from there. ‘Sorry,’ he said, he needed to get to bed.  He said it in fewer words than I just wrote but it probably took longer for him to say it than for you to read it."

     "I visited him almost daily in the hospital before he died, and, as with his commitment to his exercise, he never gave up his battle with lung cancer … it had wrest life away from him!"